Viruses VIRUSES Viruses are small packages of genes

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VIRUSES Viruses measured in nanometers (nm). Require electron microscopy. Viruses are small packages of genes Consist of protein coat around nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) Obligate intracellular parasites •Cannot grow or reproduce by itself –Have no independent metabolic pathways for anabolic synthesis •Reproduce (replicate) only by using ...

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Viruses VIRUSES Viruses are small packages of genes Viruses VIRUSES Viruses are small packages of genes
VIRUSES Viruses measured in nanometers (nm). Require electron microscopy. Viruses are small packages of genes Consist of protein coat around nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) Obligate intracellular parasites •Cannot grow or reproduce by itself –Have no independent metabolic pathways for anabolic synthesis •Reproduce (replicate) only by using ...
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Ch. 19 Viruses - Region 14 Ch. 19 Viruses - Region 14
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Viruses - houstonisd.org Viruses - houstonisd.org
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2012 BC530wh - 02 - Viruses - V02 2012 BC530wh - 02 - Viruses - V02
fold symmetry have been selected in a regular manner to be replaced by five-folds. Twenty triangles (in green; tough to find except for T=1!) correspond to the surfaces of the icosahedron, where each corner of the triangles corresponds to a five-fold axis. The icosahedral asymmetric unit is shown as the blue-ish triangle.
INACTIVATION OF VIRUSES - researchgate.net INACTIVATION OF VIRUSES - researchgate.net
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